Fail: Trying to sue a belief – Scientology in France

November 23, 2011 at 11:42 pm 1 comment

I’ve always tried to keep this blog on topic about amazing photography and great graffiti that I’ve spotted around as I visit different parts of my city or different cities. But every so often (like here) I blow a gasket and go totally off topic.

Recently there’s been a court case against Scientology in France. I don’t know all the details of the case and frankly I don’t care. What’s fantastically annoying though is how people try to sue someone’s belief. OK so they’re saying they are suing someone in particular and try to cripple the organization or something like this, WTF?! Don’t they realize that they’re going after that nebulous thing called a belief? How are they planning to “remedy” that.

Some people (myself included) believe that the principles of Scientology are correct and that they work and we feel we’re better off because of them. Millions of people feel that way, unfortunately it’s still a very minority religion but we’re pretty happy about our religion. Some people came to Scientology were not happy with what they got felt upset about having donated what they donated and left. They requested to get their donations refunded to them. They got their donations back. Yet they then go off and sue for some “damage” done to them.

OK let’s discuss the damage. Scientology is about the spirit (thetan in Scientology terms) and making the individual more aware and more capable of managing their life. So far aside from a donation made by the person there’s no material effect. Then after a certain number of days/hours in receiving counselling they claim it didn’t work and they want their donations refunded. OK that happens and they leave. Obviously someone in the Church messed up since that’s not supposed to happen. But we’re not perfect and it can happen. So wait, now they said they had damage? what damage? they don’t believe they’re a thetan and they’ve been talking to a minister in counselling how damaging is that? Duress? give me a break – the biggest duress a Scientologist has to face is the amount of physical pressure he has to face when squeezing the cans of the e-meter. And I’ll let you find out how much pressure that is.

All right now next someone will say it’s the “mental pressure” OK, so let’s even assume there is such a thing. Then why in the world does the person stay and take it in. I mean we’re free people aren’t we? Just walk the heck out. If someone comes to your door and is trying to sell you something you’re not interested in what are you going to do? Tell them to get lost and if you don’t have the courage to do that you’ll listen and tell them you’ll think about it.

Now another point that I see coming up is how Scientology is putting tremendous pressure on the plaintiffs and witnesses to stop talking. What pressure one may think? I’d think of stuff like in the movies, bullies with lead pipes coming to see them in dark alleys. I wouldn’t be quite comfortable with that if I was a witness or plaintiff. But no, the tremendous pressure Scientology is putting on them is just negotiating a settlement – a financial settlement. Wow how tough is that, receive a cheque – I can feel the sweat running off my forehead already. What are they talking about? And isn’t it written in the bible to settle out of court? I think any lawyer will advise one to settle a case out of court.

Oh and then there’s the classical little comment about how Scientology undermines family. Actually I’ve done a little more study on that, because I’ve seen families not doing too well and so I went to dig a little further with both sides (not just my family) real families. You see I’ve always had a really close relationship with my family even though they aren’t Scientologists. I respect that they don’t agree with my views and they respect mine, we actually get along really well. So I wondered why some aren’t.

What’s odd is that in EVERY case where I noticed there was a problem, that problem existed way before Scientology, I’ve checked many and I repeat EVERY case had a problem way before they got into Scientology. If anything in Scientology if it turns out that someone has a crap relationship with their non-Scientologist family one is informed that until that is handled the person will not be going further on their counselling.

It’s the firm belief that in Scientology one can’t live entirely for one-self or entirely for Scientology or entirely for something else. There has to be a balance of self, family, group, humanity etc – someone who is working ONLY to save the population and isn’t taking care of himself and his family isn’t going to be at it for long.

So about Scientology breaking up families, it’s just wrong. Like totally wrong. If anything is forces them back together. Of course saying that Scientology takes the kids away is an awesome headline, it’s also a huge lie. Unfortunately those two regularly go together.

One last thing to those who still think taking Scientology to court or any other action will actually stop them, it wont. You’re up against a belief, those that believe will always find a way to re-group.

It took a little less than a decade for freedom to break through the iron curtain, in the end it’ll always break through.

I’ll end with a famous quote that is attributed to Voltaire but which he never wrote (maybe he just said it) and which many people could learn from:

“I disapprove of what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it.”

There you go my utterly off-topic rant about the current BS happening against Scientology.

Cheers. [;-]

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Entry filed under: scientology. Tags: , , , , , , .

Kouka 7-story building Graffiti in Paris 3D graffiti of amazing quality

1 Comment Add your own

  • 1. Chuck Beatty  |  November 29, 2011 at 12:55 pm

    I worked in the staff ranks for 27 years in Scientology, in the US. A detailed in depth study of L. Ron Hubbard’s church policies, which direct the members, resulting in many of Scientology’s continuing controversies, is the exact issue at hand here.

    There are two recent books, one by Janet Reitman, one by Hugh Urban, which are helpful.

    But still, to date, no in depth study of the operative church policies and in depth surveying of the church’s present staff application of those policies has yet been done.

    Scientology is only 60 or so years old, and hasn’t developed a self critical theologin or historian class amongst itself.

    I consider the movement in the “media stage” and beginner scholarly studies phase, of its history.

    The movement does operate very clearly by clearcut church policies, and even leaked recent church programs, any citizen would agree, are abusive and irreligious, the proof of following their Hubbard church policy is in the public domain. Challenging their church rules which are irreligious, is certainly relevant public discussion.

    Again, only 60 years old, we’ll see if Scientology can evolve and drop its most offensive church policies, since in any event, if the public are kept informed of Scientology’s ongoing behavior, that is a good public service that the media is minimally providing.

    No large comparative studies, detailed and well informed, have been done on Scientology church policies compared to the rest of traditional religions.

    I myself would think that a sort of “Consumer’s Report” of religions, categorizing how different religions engage in various behavior, would be helpful to citizens in selecting which religion might interest them, if their present religion isn’t.

    To say beliefs can’t be legislated, what are you talking about. Church behavior that is illegal, is already covered by the law.

    Church behavior that the public doesn’t consider ethical, is relevant to be discussed.

    I freely answer any questions relating to Scientology church policies, particularly the offensive policies that cause the church it’s seemingly never ending controversies.

    Chuck Beatty
    ex staff Scientology (1975-2003)
    Pittsburgh, USA
    chuckbeatty77@aol.com
    412=260-1170

    Reply

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